Rump Gallery Exhibitions

I Wore Her All Around Me is an installation of text, imagery, and textiles by Trish J Gibson. This work exists around themes of southern tradition, queer connectivity, loss, growth, and generational inheritance. The texts are in the golden shovel format - using Dorothy Allison’s poems from her work, The Women Who Hate Me as a structure for the writings. The textiles are placed within the space as tokens which quantify the existence of a connection between a physical and spirited matriarchy which both exists in Gibson’s history and is summoned within the space itself. I Wore Her All Around Me is a deeply personal account of the process of growing up as a queer woman within a rural southern structure, coming out, and reclaiming one's own narrative.

 

Trish J Gibson is a Southern-American photographer and writer originally from East Tennessee, currently living and working in Richmond, Virginia. Gibson’s work revolves around interpersonal relationships, southern traditions, rural queerness, oral retellings, and the complicated nature of excavated histories.

Trish J. Gibson: I Wore Her All Around Me

Opening Reception: Saturday, January 18, 5-8pm

Closing Reception: Saturday, February 8, 5-7pm

Born on Oahu, Hawai’i, Noelani Jones (she/they) is the “Weaver Beaver,” known to be a wild and fearless, skyrocket weaver. She is a community-building fiber artist passionate about strengthening communities and individuals with art and a kuleana for the natural world. Finding sacredness and comfort in repetition, Jones knows weaving as a daily ritual, weaving as a ceremony, weaving as a gift. By following the threads of her attention, she takes the conversation with the loom slow, as fast as she can believing anything can be a thread and anyone can be a weaver. Jones considers her textile production as a direct process to subvert capitalism through practices of re-use, slow making, and using natural materials for dye. She is interested in perceived value, labor, and time embodied in handmade textiles.

Noelani Jones: PENELOPE

Opening Reception: Saturday, December 8, 5-8pm

Closing Reception: Saturday, December 21, 5-7pm

Through a combination of videos and objects, my work recreates and manifests gender variant, specifically trans-masculine bodies. Through the use of objects I navigate the way queer and trans bodies take up space. I implement assemblage of found materials as a way of referencing the reality of owning a gender variant or trans body. Through video I portray the way these bodies transcend space. Video allows for the visualization of environments and objects that can’t or don’t exist in the physical world. This reality revolves around manipulating mentality and physicality in order to maintain a balance between gender euphoria and dysphoria. 


Transness, and its many instantiations, takes precedence in my work. In some pieces, I act as a stand in for the embodiment of the trans-masculine experience. In others, computer generated 3D renderings of the perfect male body take on that role. Narratives of transition are present in each piece. My most recent work and research is influenced by the broader concepts of dysphoria and gender nonconformity and searching for them in inconspicuous places such as 3D rendering software and reality TV. Influenced by queer bodies, theory and object-making, my work illustrates the ways gender variance exists and operates within liminal spaces. 

Nor Sanchez: How To Cross A River Riding Bareback

Opening Reception: Saturday, December 3, 6-8pm

Closing Reception: Saturday, December 6, 6-8pm

Inspired by the double-consciousness, LaRissa explores the complexity of cultural identity in relation to blackness. Stemming from personal experience, she explores the in-between spaces and addresses issues she has experienced regarding identity as a biracial woman in America. Through the use of phrases, objects, or personal interactions, her work extracts discrepancies about the black reality compared to cultural expectations and biases. Being African-American and Korean has created a twoness, that is always conflicting and pulling at one another for cultural recognition and unified understanding. Though her skin is brown, she is also Asian. What does it mean to identify as black, brown, Asian, afro-Asian, hybrid, mixed, African-American, woman? Heavily influenced by personal experience, her work challenges these questions in connection to community, family, culture, gender, race and color politics.
 

LaRissa Rogers: Invisible Weight

Opening Reception: Saturday, November 9, 5-8pm

Closing Reception: Saturday, November 30, 5-7pm

Jessica Taylor is a photographer and sculptor whose integrated practice calls into question the lethal gaps in US gun legislation. Taylor’s work touches on the quiet destruction of her own family as the result of an accidental shooting between brothers, one of whom was her father. Her work also explores the trauma that physical objects can hold, and how the pain of one’s lived experiences can become long-lasting and intergenerational.

 

Riley Goodman, raised in the Patapsco River Valley of Maryland, inquires familial mythologies, folktales, and the greater history of America in effort to understand what endures, and subsequently how this endurance impacts his own presence in the canon. Goodman juxtaposes archival imagery and material from his personal collections of artifact and ephemera with the visual interpretation of researched, often folk-based, storytelling. When these elements combine, the resulting work forms a narrative that rather than noting a specific period, creates an ever-occurring amalgamation of time. By establishing this crafted world, Goodman forces the viewer to question the tenants of authenticity, leaving the idea of 'historical truth' in an undisclosed middle ground.

 

Jessica Taylor & Riley Goodman:

American Gothic

Opening Reception: Saturday, October 12, 5-8pm

Closing Reception: Saturday, November 2, 5-7pm